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Posts tagged with: ese online

Sustaining the Manitoban Francophone community: ESE in Preservice Education at the Université de Saint-Boniface

Using the community as classroom in an Indigenous Perspectives in Education course:
USB students explore the Arctic Topiaries exhibition on the Red River near The Forks, Winnipeg, in February 2019. Made of snow and ice, these warming huts were designed by @michaelmaltzanarchitecture and built by @jakobi_heinrichs in partnership with the Manitoba Inuit Association to celebrate the opening of the Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG) Inuit Art Centre.

Our What’s happening in ESE at… Series continues:
This week we’re in conversation with Dr. Laura Sims from the Université de Saint-Boniface

By Alysse Kennedy
ESE-TE Project Coordinator

Preparing preservice teachers within Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE) at the Université de Saint-Boniface (USB) in Winnipeg, Manitoba may look a little different than at other Canadian faculties of education. As the only Francophone university in western Canada, USB places a particular emphasis on linguistic and cultural sustainability.

Tasked with the responsibility of preparing French-language educators in Manitoba as well as the overarching goal to educate for reconciliation, USB’s preservice teacher education program provides mandatory courses to support its teacher candidates. These courses are purposefully related to both the local communities being served and the long-standing cultural context within which the university is inherently steeped. Consequently, at the heart of these courses you’ll find pedagogical approaches that are not only community-focused but also community-based: teaching and learning strategies that address cultural and social aspects of ESE in TE (For more on these pedagogical approaches, see Block, Sims and Beeman, 2016).

Dr. Sims cites using the community as classroom, the community as teacher, using inquiry-based learning and research-based teachings as powerful pedagogical approaches not just for teaching about environmental and social justice concepts but to also engender a deeper context of overall inclusion (for more on inclusion see Sims and Desmarais, 2020). This commitment to inclusion is multifaceted. It includes growing the Francophone community within Manitoba. It includes anti-racist education as the Francophone community is becoming more diverse, with the majority (57%) of new Francophone arrivals being of African descent. Inclusive practices also have a crucial focus on decolonization: an earnest effort is made to focus on fulfilling their Treaty 1 responsibilities (for more on Dr. Sims’ experience teaching this course see Sims, 2019). Courses taught by Dr. Sims integrate ESE in an interdisciplinary way to encourage broader lateral thinking as well as collaboration.

With respect to managing eco-anxiety when dealing with tough topics like the environmental crisis, Dr. Sims strongly feels that community-based learning, using nature as a teacher and promoting agency through inquiry, action-based learning and responsible citizenship help to connect students’ psychological contexts with the environmental. These can foster positive mental health and wellness (for more see Sims, Rocque, and Desmarais, in press). These are aspects tied to inclusion that Dr. Sims believes can help USB’s faculty of education face the environmental crisis in a more meaningful way for their students.

Check out articles mentioned in this post below:

Block, L.A., Sims, L., and Beeman, C. (2016). Contextualizing education for sustainability and teacher education in Manitoba faculties of education. In D. Karrow, M. DiGiuseppe, P.  Elliott, Y. Gwekwerere, and H. Inwood, (Eds.), Canadian perspectives on initial teacher environmental education praxis (pp. 128–152). Canadian Association for Teacher Education.

Sims, L. (2019). Inspirée face aux défis: l’expérience d’une professeure non autochtone en lien à l’intégration des perspectives autochtones dans la formation des enseignants en contexte minoritaire francophone manitobain. Cahiers franco-canadiens de l’ouest, 31(1), 89-108.

Sims, L., and Desmarais, M.-É. (2020). Planning to overcome perceived barriers: environmental and sustainability education, inclusion, and accessibility. International Journal of Education and Sustainability, 3(1), 1-17.

Sims, L., Rocque, R., and Desmarais, M.É. (in press). Enabling students to face the environmental crisis and climate change with resilience: Inclusive environmental and sustainability education approaches and strategies for coping with eco-anxiety. International journal of higher education and sustainability.

Check out more articles related to teaching from USB’s Dr. Laura Sims below:

Beeman, C., and Sims, L. (2019). From relationship to something more: Environmental and sustainability education and a new ontological position. In D. Karrow and M. DiGiuseppe (eds.), Environmental and sustainability education in teacher education: Canadian perspectives (193-208). Springer.

Sims, L., Asselin, M., and Falkenberg, T. (2020). Environmental and sustainability education in pre-service teacher education in Canada: A case study. Canadian Journal of Environmental Education, 23(1), 14-32.

Check out this recorded webinar on strategies for helping students cope with eco-anxiety (available in French and English):

English version of webinar: 

Desmarais, M.-É., Sims, L. and Rocque, R. (2020, august). Helping Students Cope with Eco-anxiety: 11 Strategies Educators can Use. [Video]. Loom. https://www.loom.com/share/c3808b71512a4bf8a90765570df00fca 

French version of webinar: 

Desmarais, M.-É., Sims, L. et Rocque, R. (2020, août).Aider les élèves à faire face à l’écoanxiété : 11 stratégies à mettre en œuvre. [Vidéo]Loomhttps://www.loom.com/share/e2fa6daec23f45058303b0f68974f994 

Thank you to Dr. Laura Sims for participating in an interview.


Honouring Dr. Lucie Sauvé’s Contributions to Environmental and Sustainability Education/Hommage aux contributions de la Dr Lucie Sauvé à l’éducation relative à l’environnement et à la viabilité

Special Guest Author post by Dr. Doug Karrow
Photo courtesy of Dr. Lucie Sauvé

Note – A French-language version of this post is available following the English version

Dr. Lucie Sauvé

The Canadian Environmental Education and Communication Network (EECOM)’s Standing Committee on Environmental and Sustainability Education in Teacher Education congratulates Dr. Lucie Sauvé on the recent announcement of her retirement.

Lucie has been an avid supporter of the Standing Committee since its inception in 2017. She was a key and active participant during the National Roundtable hosted by Trent University, delivering one of its keynote addresses while contributing to several roundtables. She has provided important academic and emotional support to the fledgling organization since its early days, through her involvement in the Standing Committee’s research and outreach activities. In recent years, she has assisted by contributing key advice and resources to support federal grant applications and important research to various knowledge mobilization activities, e.g., Sauvé, L. (2019). Transversality, diversity, criticality, and activism: Enhancing E(S)E in teacher education. In D. Karrow & M. DiGiuseppe (Eds.), Environmental and sustainability education in teacher education: Canadian perspectives, (pp. 49-62). Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature AG. ISBN: 978-3-030-25015-7

Dr. Sauvé began her education career as a history, geography and Latin teacher and contributed to the production and dissemination of educational materials in Quebec. She segued to academic life in the 1980’s by completing a master’s degree in environmental science and then the 1990’s by completing a doctoral degree, the first in the French-speaking world to focus on environmental education (read more about this here).

After a short appointment at the University of Quebec in Trois-Rivières in 1991, she joined the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) in 1993 where she remained until retirement at the rank of full professor of the Department of Didactics, Faculty of Educational Sciences and Director of the Research centre in environmental education and ecocitizenship (visit the Centre’ERE website here).

Lucie held the Canada Research Chair in Relative Education to the Environment from 2001-2011 contributing to developing of research in environmental education. As well, she has led several major international cooperation projects in Bolivia, Brazil, Columbia, and Bolivia.

I recall meeting Lucie for the first time as she helped coordinate and co-chair the 5th World Environmental Education Congress (WEEC), Montreal, Quebec, 2009. I was immediately captivated by her passion, unassuming leadership style, and the unique manner she conceptualized environmental education which focused on our “relationship with the environment [which] contributes to the formulation of our being-in-the-world. . . .” (read more here). This perspective on environmental education helped foster a much-needed critique on the reductive tendency of the ‘education for sustainable development’ discourse, which emphasized the development of an ethical social relationship with our environment.

Lucie’s research activities are exemplary and her publication record impressive, as is her ongoing directorship of the Centr’ERE of UQAM, where her legacy remains.

Anyone who has had the honour and pleasure of working with Lucie first-hand knows of her grace, passion, and keen intellect. In our ongoing work to educate another generation of teachers on the issues of Environmental and Sustainability Education, Lucie has been stalwart. We wish her all the best as she enters another exciting chapter of her life, as dedicated as ever to lead and educate a future generation Canadians about their ethical relationship with the environment.

Thank you, Lucie!

Hommage aux contributions de la Dr Lucie Sauvé à l’éducation relative à l’environnement et à la viabilité

Traduction libre du texte Honouring Dr. Lucie Sauvé’s Contributions to Environmental and Sustainability Education par Dr Doug Karrow

Photo de Dr Lucie Sauvé

Le Comité permanent du Réseau canadien d’éducation et de communication relatives à l’environnement (EECOM) sur l’éducation à l’environnement et à la viabilité dans la formation des enseignants félicite la Dr Lucie Sauvé pour l’annonce récente de sa retraite.

Lucie est une fervente collaboratrice du Comité permanent depuis sa création en 2017. Elle a été une participante clé et active lors de la Table ronde nationale organisée par l’Université Trent, prononçant l’un de ses discours principaux tout en contribuant à plusieurs panels. Elle a fourni un important et chaleureux soutien académique à cette organisation naissante depuis ses débuts, grâce à sa participation aux activités de recherche et de sensibilisation du Comité permanent. Au cours des dernières années, elle a offert des conseils et des ressources clés pour soutenir les demandes de subventions fédérales et d’importantes recherches dans le cadre de diverses activités de mobilisation des connaissances : par exemple, Sauvé, L. (2019). Transversality, diversity, criticality, and activism: Enhancing E(S)E in teacher education. In D. Karrow & M. DiGiuseppe (Eds.), Environmental and sustainability education in teacher education: Canadian perspectives, (pp. 49-62). Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature AG. ISBN: 978-3-030-25015-7

La Dr Sauvé a commencé sa carrière en éducation comme enseignante d’histoire, de géographie et de latin et a contribué à la production et à la diffusion de matériel pédagogique au Québec. Elle est entrée dans la vie universitaire dans les années 1980 en complétant une maîtrise en sciences de l’environnement puis dans les années 1990,  en complétant un doctorat, le premier dans le monde francophone à se concentrer sur l’éducation relative à l’environnement (en savoir plus ici).

Après une courte nomination à l’Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières en 1991, elle s’est jointe à l’Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) en 1993 où elle est demeurée jusqu’à la retraite comme professeure titulaire au Département de didactique, Faculté des sciences de l’éducation, et en tant que directrice du Centre de recherche en éducation et formation relatives à l’environnement et à l’écocitoyenneté (visitez le site Internet du Centre’ERE ici).

Lucie a été titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en éducation relative à l’environnement de 2001 à 2011, contribuant au développement de la formation et de la recherche en éducation environnementale. De plus, elle a dirigé plusieurs grands projets de coopération internationale en Bolivie, au Brésil, en Colombie et en Bolivie.

Je me souviens avoir rencontré Lucie pour la première fois alors qu’elle aidait à coordonner et coprésider le 5e Congrès mondial d’éducation relative à l’environnement (WEEC), tenu à Montréal, Québec, en 2009. J’ai été immédiatement captivé par sa passion, son style de leadership sans prétention et sa manière unique de conceptualiser une éducation relative à l’environnement axée sur notre « relation à l’environnement [qui] contribue à la formation de notre être-au-monde. […] » (en savoir plus ici). Cette perspective sur l’éducation relative à l’environnement a contribué à susciter une critique indispensable de la tendance réductrice du discours associé à l’éducation pour le développement durable, en mettant l’accent sur le développement d’une relation sociale éthique avec notre environnement.

Les activités de recherche de Lucie sont exemplaires et son bilan de publications impressionnant, tout comme sa direction du Centr’ERE de l’UQAM, où son héritage demeure.

Quiconque a eu l’honneur et le plaisir de travailler avec Lucie connaît sa grâce, sa passion et son intelligence vive. Dans notre travail continu pour éduquer une autre génération d’enseignant.e.s sur les questions de l’éducation relative à l’environnement et à la viabilité, Lucie a été bien présente . Nous lui offrons nos meilleurs vœux alors qu’elle entre dans un autre chapitre passionnant de sa vie, aussi dévouée que jamais à éduquer les futures générations de Canadien.ne.s, concernant en particulier leur relation éthique avec l’environnement.

Merci Lucie!


WEBINAR EVENT | “Shifting ESE Online in Teacher Education” – Sept. 24 @ 1:00pm (EST)

Join teacher educators from across Canada and the US to discuss how they are pivoting environmental learning in teacher education to digital formats. Learn from faculty experienced with online teaching about their preferred strategies, promising practices, and innovative ways they are engaging preservice students and inservice teachers in Environmental & Sustainability Education.

Details:
Thursday September 24, 2020 – 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada) 
Register in advance for this webinar using this Zoom link here

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

We look forward to having you join us for this free event!